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Price of Liberty

A display of the true nature of the American political machine. This blog is a collection of posts and news articles predominantly focusing on the West's setting sun. Check out the link portal below or scroll through the infinite multitude of posts. View my tag cloud. Yes, some of these posts are apolitical and personal in nature.

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Posted July 28th
reblog | 9 notes
lillabet:

yes hello I am secretly a reptilian

is that California on your cheek? HOLLYWOOD IS A GLOBALIST CONSPIRACY I KNEW IT

lillabet:

yes hello I am secretly a reptilian

is that California on your cheek? HOLLYWOOD IS A GLOBALIST CONSPIRACY I KNEW IT

Posted July 28th
reblog | 2,414 notes

The most common ding I give to RPG admins looking for a critique or review from me is the use of serif fonts in their themes. I hope this clears up any confusion as to why serif fonts are obnoxious as hell to read and will make me (and other potential applicants) want to click away from your blog without even attempting to read a thing.

The original infographic can be found here.

Posted July 28th
reblog | 36,918 notes

jinoras-light:

I’m sure he’d be proud too

Posted July 28th
reblog | 40 notes
vivalaliberty:

antigovernmentextremist:

A few weeks ago I made a post about the Tor browser and the importance of taking steps to protect yourself online to insure your privacy is not violated by government spooks or cybercriminals. Tor is a great way of concealing your internet activities from prying eyes. Another great tool that I use is HTTPS everywhere. These are both minimally invasive ways of adding extra layers of security to your internet browsers and online life.
Today, I’ve spent the better half of an hour installing and setting up email encryption on my Macbook. It’s a bit more complex and requires some tech savviness to set up but the step by step instructions were easy enough to follow. For Mac I’m using GPGTools, an open source version of PGP encryption for Mac systems. Windows can us GPG4win and I’m sure there’s a version out there for Linux users. GPGTools is cool because it incorporates encryption tools directly into the Mail app on Mac devices.
The picture above is of my public encryption key. If you ever want to email me encrypted messages you’ll need this key to do so. I’ve made a separate page for this key so you can easily copy and paste this into the Keychain software you’ll use to send me the message: http://antigovernmentextremist.tumblr.com/public+key
Encryption works by a combination of a public and private key. I make my public key available to the public, like it’s name suggests, so that individuals can send me encrypted messages. I’ll then use my own secret private key to decrypt the message. This insures that only the author and recipient of the message will be able to view the contents.
Encryption isn’t just something for paranoid antigovernment extremists. If you ever need to send files pertaining to banking activities, medical history, anything pertaining to your identity like your SSN and more should be encrypted. It also has the added of bonus of being nearly impossible for NSA and other government snoops to read your messages.

Worth sharing :)

vivalaliberty:

antigovernmentextremist:

A few weeks ago I made a post about the Tor browser and the importance of taking steps to protect yourself online to insure your privacy is not violated by government spooks or cybercriminals. Tor is a great way of concealing your internet activities from prying eyes. Another great tool that I use is HTTPS everywhere. These are both minimally invasive ways of adding extra layers of security to your internet browsers and online life.

Today, I’ve spent the better half of an hour installing and setting up email encryption on my Macbook. It’s a bit more complex and requires some tech savviness to set up but the step by step instructions were easy enough to follow. For Mac I’m using GPGTools, an open source version of PGP encryption for Mac systems. Windows can us GPG4win and I’m sure there’s a version out there for Linux users. GPGTools is cool because it incorporates encryption tools directly into the Mail app on Mac devices.

The picture above is of my public encryption key. If you ever want to email me encrypted messages you’ll need this key to do so. I’ve made a separate page for this key so you can easily copy and paste this into the Keychain software you’ll use to send me the message: http://antigovernmentextremist.tumblr.com/public+key

Encryption works by a combination of a public and private key. I make my public key available to the public, like it’s name suggests, so that individuals can send me encrypted messages. I’ll then use my own secret private key to decrypt the message. This insures that only the author and recipient of the message will be able to view the contents.

Encryption isn’t just something for paranoid antigovernment extremists. If you ever need to send files pertaining to banking activities, medical history, anything pertaining to your identity like your SSN and more should be encrypted. It also has the added of bonus of being nearly impossible for NSA and other government snoops to read your messages.

Worth sharing :)

Posted July 28th
reblog | 30 notes
eltigrechico:

fatal-conceit:

“This chart shows the relationship between the relative minimum wage (the minimum wage as a fraction of the average hourly wage) and unemployment rates for workers with different educational attainments. Historically, as the relative minimum wage has risen, unemployment among college-educated workers has not changed, unemployment among high-school-educated workers has risen slightly, unemployment among workers without high school diplomas has increased moderately, and unemployment among young workers without high school diplomas has increased dramatically. ”- Anthony Davies, Does the Minimum Wage Increase Worker Productivity?

Important to remember that most of the advocates for raising the minimum wage come from the ranks of those bottom two lines(the ones who are least likely to be made unemployed by the minimum wage)

eltigrechico:

fatal-conceit:

This chart shows the relationship between the relative minimum wage (the minimum wage as a fraction of the average hourly wage) and unemployment rates for workers with different educational attainments. Historically, as the relative minimum wage has risen, unemployment among college-educated workers has not changed, unemployment among high-school-educated workers has risen slightly, unemployment among workers without high school diplomas has increased moderately, and unemployment among young workers without high school diplomas has increased dramatically. ”- Anthony Davies, Does the Minimum Wage Increase Worker Productivity?

Important to remember that most of the advocates for raising the minimum wage come from the ranks of those bottom two lines

(the ones who are least likely to be made unemployed by the minimum wage)

Tagged: #minimum wage

Posted July 28th
reblog | 82 notes

“The war on “terror” will never be over, it will just change locations. Like the war on drugs, prostitution, pornography, and the many others that will follow, it is a war on humanity. These wars will never be won; the State will just keep creating new boogiemen to frighten us with. The sheep will anxiously anticipate the next fall guy the State offers up as a sacrifice for the war on whatever happens to be next. Be careful, the next pawn could be me or you.”

Mike Wasdin (via thinksquad)

Posted 3 hours ago With 285 notes

Tagged: #quotes

Revealed: Read the Obama administration’s secret rulebook for labeling you a terrorist

poorrichardsnews:

image

The Obama administration continually adopts increasingly vague standards for putting somebody on a terrorist watch list.  Glen Greenwald’s website The Intercept has just published the entire guide book for placing individuals and even entire groups of people on government terror watch lists. 

from  Intercept:

The Obama administration has quietly approved a substantial expansion of the terrorist watchlist system, authorizing a secret process that requires neither “concrete facts” nor “irrefutable evidence” to designate an American or foreigner as a terrorist, according to a key government document obtained by The Intercept.

The “March 2013 Watchlisting Guidance,” a 166-page document issued last year by the National Counterterrorism Center, spells out the government’s secret rules for putting individuals on its main terrorist database, as well as the no fly list and the selectee list, which triggers enhanced screening at airports and border crossings. The new guidelines allow individuals to be designated as representatives of terror organizations without any evidence they are actually connected to such organizations, and it gives a single White House official the unilateral authority to place “entire categories” of people the government is tracking onto the no fly and selectee lists. It broadens the authority of government officials to “nominate” people to the watchlists based on what is vaguely described as “fragmentary information.” It also allows for dead people to be watchlisted.

[…]

The rulebook, which The Intercept is publishing in full, was developed behind closed doors by representatives of the nation’s intelligence, military, and law-enforcement establishment, including the Pentagon, CIA, NSA, and FBI. Emblazoned with the crests of 19 agencies, it offers the most complete and revealing look into the secret history of the government’s terror list policies to date. It reveals a confounding and convoluted system filled with exceptions to its own rules, and it relies on the elastic concept of “reasonable suspicion” as a standard for determining whether someone is a possible threat. Because the government tracks “suspected terrorists” as well as “known terrorists,” individuals can be watchlisted if they are suspected of being a suspected terrorist, or if they are suspected of associating with people who are suspected of terrorism activity.

“Instead of a watchlist limited to actual, known terrorists, the government has built a vast system based on the unproven and flawed premise that it can predict if a person will commit a terrorist act in the future,” says Hina Shamsi, the head of the ACLU’s National Security Project. “On that dangerous theory, the government is secretly blacklisting people as suspected terrorists and giving them the impossible task of proving themselves innocent of a threat they haven’t carried out.” Shamsi, who reviewed the document, added, “These criteria should never have been kept secret.”

read the rest

You can read the entire watchlist guidebook here

I highly suggest reading the document in its entirety when you have time.  There are some pretty clear-cut Constitutional violations throughout.  Due process is almost nowhere to be found. 

Posted 4 hours ago With 118 notes

“People are increasingly scared to talk about anything.”

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, in a new report from Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union on the NSA’s damaging effects on press freedom and citizens’ ability to hold our government accountable.
(via hipsterlibertarian)

That is what we call the “chilling effect” and its a detriment to the first amendment.

Posted 4 hours ago With 411 notes